Christmas at the Post Office

While technological changes have meant that the volume of Christmas cards has declined dramatically in recent years, the tradition of sending turkeys and geese through the post is a distant memory now and the days of having 1800 telephonists on duty over Christmas are long gone, it’s still a very busy time of the year for the Post Office.  People still very much like our Christmas stamps and I have picked out here a selection of some of the attractive stamps we have issued over the years.

The Irish Post Office first issued a special Christmas stamp in 1971 and since then there has been a great variety of designs and styles – from the iconography of Trinity College’s famous Book of Kells and paintings by the great masters to the fresh artistic expressions of children. The GPO’s traditional nativity scene is on display in the Public Office and with the building marking its bicentenary this year, it’s a good time to visit the Museum, post your cards and maybe buy a few souvenir items in our Philatelic Shop, special stamps or prize bonds as Christmas presents.

Christmas Stamps

The Great War

With yesterday being Remembrance Sunday and tomorrow Armistice Day, people everywhere are remembering those who were killed and injured in the First World War and other terrible conflicts. Many Post Office employees, including Irishmen, joined the army: some chose to join particular regiments, some like young Mr. Lonergan, a Boy Messenger from Fethard, the Post Office Rifles, while others  served with famous Irish regiments like the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.  The official circulars of the war years carry the weekly toll of those who died. Our image today is drawn from An Post’s archive and lists the names of some of those Post Office colleagues who died.

Dieter Facsimile 026

Post Office Roll of Honour

Fighting infection – A century-old Post Office enamel notice

Infectious disease is something very much in the news at present and serves as a reminder of another ailment that was very much feared in Ireland and continues to be so in many parts of the world. Consumption, an older word for tuberculosis, spread rapidly in areas of overcrowding and poverty and was the cause of death for many thousands of people here. The establishment of national sanatoria, a better understanding of the disease and a more caring attitude towards those who suffered from it, in addition of course to antibiotic drugs, brought great improvements but vigilance remains necessary. The Post Office, as a place where people met and transacted business, provided a space where the Postmaster General could bring the disease to the attention of people and point out one very common form of transmitting it.

Consumption Notice