Emil Haversack 1819-1888

Straying a little from Irish postal matters, today we acknowledge the contribution of Emil Haversack whose ingenious method for easing the burden of carrying things by strapping them to your back led to the hi-tech haversacks of today’s trekkers.

The Strasbourg-born postman spent his life in the French and later German postal service and the picture shows what might be construed as an early version of the haversack in use!

 

 

Haversack - early version

The postal business – always a struggle!

An Post’s recent price increases for its mail services were designed to allow it a little time to draw up plans to cope with rapidly declining letter volumes. When the Company was established as a semi-state venture in 1984, the Board at the time drew attention to the declining letter traffic of previous years and sharp price increases in 1982 which enabled it to return – briefly – to profit.

The message at the time was summed up in the words “We must get new business – and we must handle it well without increasing our costs”. The photograph shows the Chairman of the time, Fergal Quinn, of the supermarket chain leading by example and getting ready to deliver some letters.

Fergal Quinn prepares to go out on delivery

Irish identity – saying hello and goodbye

It’s strange the things which evoke a special response: take this green letter box, for instance, on loan to Dublin airport from the An Post Museum & Archive. Is it the green colour, the sight of  a familiar object on an urban streetscape, its function as a means of communication or just plain old nostalgia? Whatever the reason, lots of people like to linger beside it as they make their way through the airport.

 

 

Airport pillar box

The 1916 GPO flag-staff

The 1916 GPO flag-pole

This small section of the GPO flag staff, on which the Union Jack had traditionally been flown, is a recent donation to the An Post Museum. It is part of a somewhat longer section found amongst the rubble of the burnt-out building by one of the men contracted to clear up the debris and formed part of a private collection of 1916 and related memorabilia. The piece shows signs of cracking and is split in one place, evidence of the great heat generated by the fires that consumed the building and much of O’Connell Street during the rebellion.

A small section of the 1916 flag-pole recently donated to the An Post Museum & Archive

A small section of the 1916 flag-pole recently donated to the An Post Museum & Archive

Dramatic tales – The Last Post by Just the Lads Theatre Company

Irish theatre has long enjoyed a high reputation which was confirmed by something I saw a few weeks before Christmas. The Last Post is an innovative and engaging piece of drama which is centred on the people and activities of a fictional Returned Letters Branch of An Post. The directors, Liadain Kaminska and Darren Sinnott, and their team invite the audience into the lives of those who write and sort letters and in the process, make us think about the human need to communicate and connect with others as part of life. Using all the resources of the old fire brigade station in Rathmines as the stage , the audience is guided by the postal staff on an intimate and at times anarchic journey which culminates in a chance to sort letters in a way that would never be officially countenanced at An Post! It’s a creative and amusing piece of drama that deserves to be seen.

Stephen Ferguson – Curator, An Post Museum

Frank McGuinness

Thomas Street post office 1975

The local post office, a town sub-office like this one or more often a rural office, has long been part of the fabric of Irish life with people not only  using it to transact business but also as a place to met their friends and catch up on the news. Technological development over the last generation has brought huge change in the way people go about their business now and there has been an inevitable impact on post offices too. Photographs of local post offices form part of our archive here and I am always glad when people turn up old post office pictures and donate them to our collection. In this case, I am grateful to Mick Brown for letting me use this delightful photograph with what looks like an interesting conversation going on outside the office! You will find other great shots in his recent book on Dublin.

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Merry Christmas

This year we are not only celebrating Christmas but also two hundred years since the foundation stone of the GPO was laid in 1814. There will be free entry to the An Post Museum from the 8th December till Christmas Eve so do come and take a look at our exhibition, Letters, Lives & Liberty, and if you drop in at lunch-time, you’ll also be able to join in with the traditional carol singing in the Public Office.

Have a very Happy Christmas.

An Post Museum and the GPO are closed Sundays and Bank Holidays.

Keep an eye on this page and our social media channels to keep up to date with details for events at the An Post Museum – GPO Dublin.

Parcel post – Christmas card

While the Post Office has long carried letters, its role in parcels is not so old. During the nineteenth century, carriage of parcels was by road carters and subsequently by the railways but towards the end of the century the Post Office entered this market and following the adoption of the  Post Office (Parcels) Act in 1882, letter carriers were renamed postmen and the parcel post became part of the Department’s wider services. it was a move that proved very popular with the public though it meant a big change for the Post Office and its staff. This Christmas card from the An Post archive, sent to staff in Tullamore in 1886, offers fraternal greetings from the Dublin parcels staff. Today, the rise in online shopping means that parcel traffic is again very important for the Post Office.

Tullamore Post Card

Christmas at the Post Office

While technological changes have meant that the volume of Christmas cards has declined dramatically in recent years, the tradition of sending turkeys and geese through the post is a distant memory now and the days of having 1800 telephonists on duty over Christmas are long gone, it’s still a very busy time of the year for the Post Office.  People still very much like our Christmas stamps and I have picked out here a selection of some of the attractive stamps we have issued over the years.

The Irish Post Office first issued a special Christmas stamp in 1971 and since then there has been a great variety of designs and styles – from the iconography of Trinity College’s famous Book of Kells and paintings by the great masters to the fresh artistic expressions of children. The GPO’s traditional nativity scene is on display in the Public Office and with the building marking its bicentenary this year, it’s a good time to visit the Museum, post your cards and maybe buy a few souvenir items in our Philatelic Shop, special stamps or prize bonds as Christmas presents.

Christmas Stamps