“Wish you were here” – celebrating the postcard, 1869-2019

The idea of a post card, one side of which could be used for the address and stamp and the other for a short message, originated 150 years ago with the first plain post cards going on sale in post offices throughout the Austro-Hungarian Empire on 1st October 1869. The picture postcard was a natural development of the plain one and from the 1880s it became common in continental Europe. Holiday cards from the seaside remained popular in the 1920s and 30s and in John Hinde the Irish tourist industry found in the 1960s a man who had a genius for portraying a land where the sky was always blue, the people innocent and the scenery stunning. Today technology, for better or worse, has rendered largely obsolete a form of written communication that was once so dominant.

The hobby of postcard collecting, however, is still alive and people turn now to the cards of yesterday for understanding of a vanished world. Above all, we find in the postcard proof of the vital role played by the Post Office in bringing people together and evidence of our own unchanging need, as human beings, to communicate with each other. 

A few cards from the An Post Museum & Archive are currently on display beside the cafe in the Witness History visitor center in Dublin’s GPO, including this one from Patrick Pearse to his brother William. Written in Irish, the address caused some confusion amongst postal staff in 1915, hence the two postmarks.

Sent by Pearse from Maam Cross to Marlborough Road in Donnybrook but redirected via Phibsborough

National Lottery

Lottery ticket Royal Exchange 1777Until quite recently An Post managed the Irish National Lottery for which it received payment from the Government. The Company was also part owner. Its extensive network of post offices allowed it to sell lottery tickets economically and conveniently throughout the country. The Lottery is now run by another business.

Post Office involvement in gambling was somewhat at odds with its traditional role as a prudent home for your money and the advocate of a savings habit to be inculcated from an early age with six penny savings stamps! Lotteries were not new of course when An Post became involved in the mid-1980s as this 1777 ticket, from the Museum & Archive, demonstrates. The object here was the building of the new Royal Exchange, now the City Hall.

 

 

Urban art

The latest stamp issue from the Irish Post Office shows it is doing its best to be edgy and contemporary in its approach. The new booklet and associated stamps are striking and the booklet provides an interesting insight into the development of street art over the last twenty years or so from an expression of political protect to an art form in its own right. Admirers of the genre will be pleased to see this new addition to some of the excellent art stamps issued by the Post Office since its first foray into contemporary art  back in 1969 – remember the large format Evie Hone Eton Chapel window?

Urban street art booklet