The 1916 GPO flag-staff

The 1916 GPO flag-pole

This small section of the GPO flag staff, on which the Union Jack had traditionally been flown, is a recent donation to the An Post Museum. It is part of a somewhat longer section found amongst the rubble of the burnt-out building by one of the men contracted to clear up the debris and formed part of a private collection of 1916 and related memorabilia. The piece shows signs of cracking and is split in one place, evidence of the great heat generated by the fires that consumed the building and much of O’Connell Street during the rebellion.

A small section of the 1916 flag-pole recently donated to the An Post Museum & Archive

A small section of the 1916 flag-pole recently donated to the An Post Museum & Archive

The Penny Black – 175 Years

This is a big year for stamp collectors as they mark 175 years since the world’s first adhesive postage stamp was introduced back in 1840. The little square of black paper with a finely engraved profile of the young Queen Victoria has become an item that many collectors want to have. It’s not that expensive a stamp – it’s significance lies more in being the “first” and in what it meant for people who wrote letters. At just a penny, it really opened up correspondence, news and education for people who were formerly excluded by the high cost of postage.

Penny Black

Penny Black

The stamps were used in Ireland, of course, since the Royal Mail covered both Britain and Ireland at that time and the interesting story of how one very early Penny Black came to be used on a  letter from Dublin to London in May 1840 is told in  a little booklet, which contains an exact replica of the letter and stamps, available from our philatelic department.

The 1840 Fitzpatrick letter

The Fitzpatrick – Thomas Letter of 1840

Postal friendships

“I recently read Helene Hanff’s delightful,  84 Charing Cross Road, the story of the friendship that develops between Helene Hanff, an outgoing American literary woman and Frank Doel (married to an Irish wife Nora) employee and senior buyer at a traditional English bookshop on the Charing Cross road in London. The mood of a rather dreary and exhausted London, where rationing still prevails after the war, stands in marked contrast to the colour, energy and prosperity of New York. It’s a charming little tale of how letters and the  efficiency of the Post Office’s book-post service gradually manage to turn a routine business inquiry into friendships that last a lifetime.”

– Stephen Ferguson, Assistant Company Secretary

Book Cover

Recommended by Stephen Ferguson

Merry Christmas

This year we are not only celebrating Christmas but also two hundred years since the foundation stone of the GPO was laid in 1814. There will be free entry to the An Post Museum from the 8th December till Christmas Eve so do come and take a look at our exhibition, Letters, Lives & Liberty, and if you drop in at lunch-time, you’ll also be able to join in with the traditional carol singing in the Public Office.

Have a very Happy Christmas.

An Post Museum and the GPO are closed Sundays and Bank Holidays.

Keep an eye on this page and our social media channels to keep up to date with details for events at the An Post Museum – GPO Dublin.

Christmas at the Post Office

While technological changes have meant that the volume of Christmas cards has declined dramatically in recent years, the tradition of sending turkeys and geese through the post is a distant memory now and the days of having 1800 telephonists on duty over Christmas are long gone, it’s still a very busy time of the year for the Post Office.  People still very much like our Christmas stamps and I have picked out here a selection of some of the attractive stamps we have issued over the years.

The Irish Post Office first issued a special Christmas stamp in 1971 and since then there has been a great variety of designs and styles – from the iconography of Trinity College’s famous Book of Kells and paintings by the great masters to the fresh artistic expressions of children. The GPO’s traditional nativity scene is on display in the Public Office and with the building marking its bicentenary this year, it’s a good time to visit the Museum, post your cards and maybe buy a few souvenir items in our Philatelic Shop, special stamps or prize bonds as Christmas presents.

Christmas Stamps

Heritage Week at the An Post Museum

Heritage Week at the An Post Museum will be taking place from the 23rd August to the 30th August 2014 here in the GPO Dublin. Please note that the GPO is closed on Sundays.

Heritage Week is a great way for people of all ages to discover and explore Irish history and heritage.
Here at the GPO Dublin, the An Post Museum will be open for free from 10am to 5pm.

There are a number of special tours organised for the week-long festival exploring the history of the Irish Post Office.
Free tickets are available through Eventbrite.

Independence Day – America and Ireland via Foynes

A happy Independence Day to our friends in the USA!

This 75 year old first flight cover, kindly donated to our archive, marks the transatlantic air connection between Foynes in county Limerick and New York. For  a short period before the Second World War a flying boat service operated from Foynes and it carried mail as well as passengers. It was, of course, an expensive passage  but for those who had the means it was a fast and glamorous trip and those times are well commemorated in the Foynes Flying Boat Museum today.
The war put a stop to the flights and with the rise of jet-engine aircraft, the flying boats, as a commercial venture, were consigned to history. Shannon airport, however, developed from the operations here and established itself as a transatlantic hub.
Letter Cover

The right address?

Inspector of Lunatics – Government Buildings 1923

One of the charms of working with archives is the fun of turning up something quirky or amusing from time to time. This letter recently came to light in our archives section and demonstrates the ongoing importance of putting the right address on a letter. Postcodes of whatever ilk are likely to be much less fun than traditional addresses!

Letter from 1923

Letter from 1923

 

Patrick Scott (1921-2014) – artist and stamp designer

Image of the Month: May 2014

Patrick Scott, who died earlier this year, was an Irish artist of international renown whose distinctive signature image – a disc of shimmering gold leaf applied to a plain canvas – is instantly recognisable. On display in the GPO Museum at the moment are a couple of Scott-related items drawn from An Post’s archive.

Born in Kilbrittain in county Cork his interest in painting was encouraged by a far-sighted school-teacher at St. Columba’s College in Dublin and later by his association with the White Stag Group of painters who experimented with various aspects of modernism. Scott trained as an architect and worked for Michael Scott’s practice. Following his success at the Guggenheim in New York and the Venice Biennale he left the practice in 1960 to devote himself to artistic work.

He was a man, however, whose creative genius spanned many disciplines: he worked on the Busáras building, created many beautiful tapestries, had fun inventing street decorations and also found time to design a number of postage stamps for the Post Office.

The stamps shown here illustrate different aspects of his graphic talent. The 1972 Olympic stamps were issued to mark the 50th anniversary of the Irish Olympic Council. For this he took inspiration from a carved slab at Clonmacnoise, one of Irelands’ most famous monastic settlements. The other stamps, in colour and line, display a marked contract in style and were designed by Patrick Scott for the World Ploughing Championships in 1973.

Olympic stamp - 50th anniversary of the Irish Olympic Council

50th Anniversary of the Irish Olympic Council

Ploughing Stamp World Ploughing Championships in 1973

World Ploughing Championships in 1973

Wasteland

This little lamp box, tied up with rope, had been on loan from the An Post Museum to the Project Arts Centre in Dublin as part of an exhibition that explores the relationship between humble everyday objects and the rules and restrictions which define the society in which we live. The exhibition, Wasteland, is the inspiration of two Czech artists, Eva Kot’atkova and Dominik Lang. It continues until the 14th April.

A tied up post box